Quantcast

Friday, 2 October 2015

Shelter Dogs - Myths, Truths And Training Tips

October is "adopt a shelter dog month."

I thought this would be a great time to shed some light on some of the myths that surround shelter dogs. It is unbelievable how many dogs end up in shelters each year, the numbers are simply astronomical. Do these dogs deserve to be in a shelter? No. Is there something we can do about it? Yes! You can get up, go to a shelter, and adopt a dog! But what if you simply can't adopt another right now? How can you help?

Don't underestimate the power of social media! More shelter dogs get attention from people sharing on social media than any other source! Google some shelters, share some dogs in need of a home, donate to the shelters to help out, or even point your friends and family towards adopting a shelter dog if you know they may be out looking for a pet to add to their family.

shelter dog quote


The feeling you get knowing you have rescued a dog who has been thrown away by it's previous owner (or whatever the case may be) is a feeling you couldn't even imagine until you experience it.

People have this thing lodged in their head that a shelter dog may be un-trainable, or they might think the dog will never be able to be trusted. These things are just not true...
Shelter dogs are absolutely just as trainable as any other dog out there, you just have to take the dogs past life into consideration. A dog who was abused, will take a different type of training. It all wraps around "knowing your dog." If the shelter knows what happened in the dogs previous life, that will help the situation greatly, because then you know what you are working with. But, if the past is a mystery, you just have to work with it.

Tips for training shelter dogs:

  1. Take it slow. If you do not know the past life of your shelter dog, you won't know what might trigger certain behaviors. Be on the lookout for these things as you discover your dog, and his personality. Work around whatever setbacks arise. Work with your dog, do not force him to learn something, or do something he is not comfortable with. 
  2. Take the time to learn your dog, and his triggers. Knowing your dog, and what he will, or not react to, will help training significantly. 
  3. Be understanding. Your shelter dog may be fearful of you, or other people in your house. The worst thing you can do in this situation, is force your dog to try and bond with you. Let him take his time. Offer treats, a safe environment, and over time, your dog will learn to trust you.
Shelter dogs are amazing dogs, just searching for someone to love them. Why not adopt?

Share your rescue/adopt stories with us in the comments!


Today is our Flashback Friday blog hop. We invite you to link up, and share your favorite memories/photos with us. Use the links below to join!

Siberian Husky swimming in the pool

My flashback photo for the week is my girl Mika, having a blast in the kiddie pool. Wonderful summer memories to keep in mind with our fast approaching cold weather!

Flashback Friday is hosted by Five Sibe's Mom
Co hosted by me, from Love Is Being Owned By A Husky
**Side note - I have not received the codes for this weeks Pet Parade blog hop, but I will be sure to update you all if it gets up and running this week. Thanks for understanding. xo






Flashback Friday Link Up:

26 comments:

  1. Great post! Zoe and Phoenix are both from the shelter and they are pretty awesome dogs. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!! Shelter dogs are definitely awesome!

      Delete
  2. Both my pups were rescued from shelters. Even Hailey Bug has been trainable, for the most part!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do you know that Jen has never adopted a pet at a shelter? It's true. Every one of the animals she has cared for was in need of a home and she took them in. That's how most people end up getting their pets- from someone else. And really, if you think about it, taking in a dog from a friend or family member is no different than taking one in from the shelter. Actually it is, because if you choose a reputable shelter, your dog is going to be better-behaved and evaluated for temperament.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're absolutely right! And both Mika and Koda came from people who simply no longer wanted or could no longer care for them, so I know what you mean. Lexus on the other hand is a rescue.

      Delete
  4. I've always gotten my dogs at shelters and they've all been wonderful. No matter where you get a dog from, they'll need some training. If you're adopting an animal you should be ready to put in some effort. Have a happy Friday friends! ~RascalandRocco

    ReplyDelete
  5. I was so scared the first time that I went to volunteer at a shelter. You see so many ads about them being huddled in their cages and sad. I was so relieved to discover the shelters in my area are great. The dogs are played with and loved while waiting for their forever homes. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, those photos and videos you see of dogs in shelter all stuck in a corner and scared like.... I don't know where these places are, but my local ones are nothing like those either!

      Delete
  6. There are some amazing dogs at the shelter. There are unfortunately some that are too much for most people to handle. Too bad people don't take on pet parenting as a real responsibility. Maybe many of the dogs wouldn't end up there to begin with.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're absolutely right. Some dogs that end up in shelters can be a handful, and would require the right home and the right humans.

      Delete
  7. Great post! Some shelter dogs may take more work, but puppies take a lot of work too! As you said, all dogs need to be trained no matter their history anyway, so shelter dogs aren't necessarily that much more work. Plus not all of them there come from abusive situations or for behavioral problems. If something like that seems like too much to take on, you can look for one that was left for other reasons, such as the family moving, or the owner dying. Many are found as strays too, and may have simply gotten lost without proper ID to get them reunited with their family.
    Lots of wags and woofs from the crew at Wag n Woof Pets

    ReplyDelete
  8. Educating people is so important so thank you for this post. Daisy was from a shelter and she was more wonderful than I ever could have imagined and Cocoa is also a rescue and she is amazing. I want to help let people know how important adoption is and also how wonderful these dogs are and how they only want to love and be loved!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your welcome, and you're absolutely right!!

      Delete
  9. What a great pic of Mika! I guess we'll be swapping pools for snow soon! (personally, I can't wait!) I've had many shelter dogs and loved each and everyone with all my heart. My late angel, Chelsey, an Akita/Shepherd mix puppy we adopted from our local SPCA, although she left for the Bridge almost 10 years ago, she holds a piece of my heart forever. I still miss her. I have stories that still bring a smile to my face! Chelsey grew up with my daughter, who was just a toddler, and her dwarf bunny, Sugar, and they had such a special bond! All three in the Barbie corvette and on the swingset, and wonderful times of them lying on the floor as my daughter read them both stories! Chelsey was elderly and arthritic when the Sibes entered our family, but she was here and able to meet our first two Huskies - Harley and Gibson - and even taught Harley a few things before she left! Ah...memories! Great for Flashback Friday! Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw wow, thanks so much for sharing your stories here with us too! Wonderful memories!

      Delete
  10. Love these tips. Your quote is one of my favorites, and looks absolutely wonderful with your design.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Our dogs are not shelter dogs, but I agree it can be a good option for people. (Although if I am being truthful I am becoming more and more disturbed that shelters have now become big business. When something becomes big business, there is often times more, not less of it, so I fear the shelter population will only grow.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting point. Something I have never thought of. You're right though, when something grows in popularity, it doesn't really go away, it only grows. Hmmm....

      Delete

♥Thoughts for the pack? Leave us a comment♥

SomaPet

SomaPet- For the life of your pet